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England manager: Sam Allardyce loses job


The FA can confirm that Sam Allardyce has left his position as England manager.

Allardyce’s conduct, as reported today, was inappropriate of the England manager. He accepts he made a significant error of judgement and has apologised. However, due to the serious nature of his actions, The FA and Allardyce have mutually agreed to terminate his contract with immediate effect.

This is not a decision that was taken lightly but The FA’s priority is to protect the wider interests of the game and maintain the highest standards of conduct in football. The manager of the England men’s senior team is a position which must demonstrate strong leadership and show respect for the integrity of the game at all times.

Gareth Southgate will take charge of the men’s senior team for the next four matches against Malta, Slovenia, Scotland and Spain whilst The FA begins its search for the new England manager.

The FA wishes Sam well in the future.

A £400,000 agreement with a football agency firm is a potential conflict of interest for an international football manager as it raises the possibility that he is “employed” by a company whose footballer clients could benefit from preferential treatment.

Allardyce told undercover reporters that the banned practice was still possible in “all of South America, Portugal, Spain, Belgium, all of Africa” and that the Ecuadorean player Enner Valencia had been under a third party ownership agreement when he signed him for £12 million for West Ham from a Mexican club in 2014.

The third party ownership arrangementended on the transfer and West Ham acquired the player “whole”. Asked if it would be a problem to get involved in third party ownership.  Allardyce said: “It’s not a problem.”

Third party ownership involves an agent or an investor owning part of the financial rights to a player, meaning transfer fees are partly paid to them when a player moves clubs, rather than the buying club paying all the money to the selling club.

During a meeting at a London hotel in August, Allardyce, who was appointed by the FA on July 22, was happy to discuss third party ownership of players with two undercover reporters posing as representatives of a Far East-based company looking to get a foothold in the lucrative world of English football.

He attended the meeting with his agent, Mark Curtis, and his  financial adviser, Shane Moloney, after being approached via the football agent Scott McGarvey, a long-time friend of Allardyce who was unaware of the undercover reporters’ involvement.

Sam Allardyce tried to make as much money as possible as England manager – before his first match.

He had not yet taken charge of his first international match, or even his first training session, but already another pressing matter was on Sam Allardyce’s agenda: how to make as much money as possible from his new status as England manager.

The job comes with a salary of £3 million per year, plus bonuses, but as Allardyce sat down to a meeting in a May Fair hotel he was eager to explore ways of earning even more.

On the table was an offer for Allardyce to fly to Singapore and Hong Kong four times a year to address investors in a Far East firm that wanted to buy football players. Allardyce, 61, was unperturbed by the fact that the firm – in reality a fictitious company whose representatives were undercover Telegraph reporters – was proposing third party ownership of players, in contravention of Football Association and Fifa rules.

During the meeting he remarked that Sir Alex Ferguson gets “four hundred, five hundred grand a pop” for speaking engagements, while Robbie Williams got “£1.6 million for a wedding. Just singing”.

Less than 20 minutes into the meeting with total strangers, Allardyce had agreed, in principle, to a £400,000-a-year deal to represent a company he had never heard of. The England manager insisted he would deliver “value for money” in helping to attract investors, boasting of his popularity in the Orient.

Over the course of two meetings, lasting four hours in total, Allardyce told the fictitious businessmen that it was “not a problem” to bypass the rules introduced by his employers in 2008.telegraph